Home Posts Moderna Claims That Its COVID-19 Injection Is Effective In Children As Young As 12 Years Old.
Moderna Claims That Its COVID-19 Injection Is Effective In Children As Young As 12 Years Old.
Coronavirus

Moderna Claims That Its COVID-19 Injection Is Effective In Children As Young As 12 Years Old.


Moderna announced on Tuesday that its COVID-19 vaccine provides strong protection for children as young as 12, putting the vaccine on track to become the second option for that age group in the United States.

With global vaccine supplies still limited, much of the world is struggling to vaccinate adults in the fight to end the pandemic. However, earlier this month, the United States and Canada authorized the use of another vaccine — the Pfizer and BioNTech shot — beginning at the age of 12.

Moderna plans to be the first in line, submitting its teen data to the US Food and Drug Administration and other global regulators early next month.

The company studied over 3,700 12- to 17-year-olds, and preliminary results showed that the vaccine induced the same signs of immune protection in children as it does in adults, as well as the same type of temporary side effects such as sore arms, headache, and fatigue.

There were no COVID-19 diagnoses in children who received two doses of the Moderna vaccine, compared to four cases in children who received dummy shots, according to a press release from the company.

While children are far less likely than adults to become seriously ill from COVID-19, they account for approximately 14% of all coronavirus cases in the United States, with at least 316 deaths, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

With plenty of vaccine supply in the United States, younger teens flocked to get Pfizer's shot in the days after the FDA made it available to them, as part of a push to get as many kids vaccinated as possible before the next school year.

Both Pfizer and Moderna have begun testing in even younger children, ranging in age from 11 to 6-month-old babies. This testing is more complex: Teens receive the same dose as adults, but researchers are testing smaller doses in younger children. Experts hope to see results in the fall.

___
The Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education provides funding to the Associated Press Health and Science Department, but the AP is solely responsible for all content.

Coronavirus: A Stardia Handbook

Do the side effects of your vaccines predict how you will react to COVID-19?

“I've been sick for almost a year from COVID-19.”

Should your child attend a summer camp this year?

These are the most common consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health.

On our coronavirus hub page, you can find all of this and more.

0 Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published, Required fields are marked with *.